Census: An Increase in Multigenerational Households

A recent Census report highlights a component of pent-up housing demand – the rise of multigenerational households.

Data from the 2009 – 2011 American Community Survey (ACS) reported that 4.3 million households were multigenerational, or 5.6% of the total of 76.4 million family households with more than one person. This count represents a significant increase in the share of multigenerational households from 3.7% of total family households in 2000 and 4.0% of total family households in 2010.

The ACS defines multigenerational households as families with three or more generations. Some 64.6% of multigenerational households included a householder, a child of the householder and the grandchild of the householder. Households comprised of the householder with a parent (or parent-in-law) of the householder and child of the householder were a 33.7% share of total multigenerational households. Only 1.7% of multigenerational households were comprised of the householder plus a parent (or parent-in-law), child and grandchild of the householder.

The Census report indicates a higher share of such households in the American South and the West, with multigenerational household rates of 6.0% and 6.7% respectively. The shares are 4.2% in the Midwest and 5.5% in the Northeast . This is somewhat consistent with a previous look at households containing non-relatives.

The Census reported a higher share of multigenerational Hispanic, African American and Asian households, with multigenerational family household shares of 10.3%, 9.5% and 9.4% respectively. These shares compare to 3.7% for Non-Hispanic Whites. The Census data suggest expectations that in many areas of the country, the non-majority population will drive future household formations and home purchases, with a particular need to accommodate larger, multigenerational families.

An interesting long-term research question, and one that builders must address in terms of servicing housing demand, is the extent to which these trends represent temporary effects from the Great Recession or long-term changes associated with a changing national population.

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8 Responses to Census: An Increase in Multigenerational Households

  1. [...] Census: An Increase in Multigenerational Households [...]

  2. [...] am the product of what today we would consider a multi-generational home.  Nine of us aged 5 to 75 moved into a newly built five-bedroom home in the early 70’s (a few of [...]

  3. John White says:

    The disproportionate number of minorities living in multi-generational housing is proof that they are suffering a disproportionate share of the misery caused by an economy managed by people who claim they are helping them.

  4. [...] Census data on multigenerational households highlight these impacts. Data from the 2009 – 2011 American Community Survey indicate that 4.3 million households were mult…. This count represents a significant increase in the share of multigenerational households from [...]

  5. […] This growth has largely been attributed to three factors; declining employment, increasing college enrollment, and declining marriage. And these changes are part of an overall increase in the establishment of multigenerational households. […]

  6. […] This growth has largely been attributed to three factors; declining employment, increasing college enrollment, and declining marriage. And these changes are part of an overall increase in the establishment of multigenerational households. […]

  7. […] This growth has largely been attributed to three factors; declining employment, increasing college enrollment, and declining marriage. And these changes are part of an overall increase in the establishment of multigenerational households. […]

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